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Corrie Ten Boom

 
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 11:12 am    Post subject: Corrie Ten Boom Reply with quote

Corrie ten Boom
From Wikipedia



Cornelia (Corrie) ten Boom (April 15, 1892 – April 15, 1983) was a Dutch Christian Holocaust survivor who helped many Jews escape the Nazis during World War II. Born in Haarlem, North Holland, ten Boom was declared a member of the Righteous Among the Nations by the State of Israel in December 1967. She died in the United States.

Early life
In 1892 she was born in Haarlem, and in 1918 the family took in the first of many children.
Activities during the Holocaust
In 1940 the Nazis invaded the Netherlands and banned ten Boom's club organization. By 1942 she and her family had become very active in the Dutch underground, hiding refugees. Ten Boom was able to rescue many Jews from certain death at the hands of the Nazi SS. The family's work in saving Jews was motivated by their staunch Christian beliefs. They helped Jews without forcing conversion, and they even provided Kosher food and honored the Sabbath. The Germans arrested the entire ten Boom family on February 28, 1944 with the help of a Dutch informant (Corrie would later discover his name to be Jan Vogel); they were sent first to Scheveningen prison, then to the Vught political concentration camp (both in the Netherlands), and finally to the notorious Ravensbrück concentration camp in Germany in September 1944, where Corrie's sister Betsie died. Corrie was released in December 1944[1]. In the movie The Hiding Place, Corrie narrates the section on her release from camp by saying that she later learned that her release had been a clerical error: it so happened that the women prisoners her age in the camp were killed in the week following her release.
Post-war
After the war Corrie returned to the Netherlands to begin rehabilitation centres. She returned to Germany in 1946, and many years of itinerant preaching in over sixty countries followed, during which time she wrote many books.
"The Hiding Place"
Ten Boom told the story of her family and their work during World War II in her most famous book, "The Hiding Place" (1971), which was made into a film of the same name by World Wide Pictures in 1975. The book and film give context to the story of Anne Frank, who was also in hiding in the Netherlands during the war.
Religious views
Her preaching focused on the Christian Gospel, with emphasis on forgiveness. In her book, "Tramp for the Lord" (1974), she tells the story of how, after she had been preaching in Germany in 1947, she was approached by one of the cruelest former Ravensbrück camp guards. She was reluctant to forgive him, but prayed that she would be able to. She wrote that she was then able to forgive, and that for a long moment we grasped each other's hands, the former guard and the former prisoner. I had never known God's love so intensely as I did then.
She also wrote (in the same passage) that in her post-war experience with other victims of Nazi brutality, it was those who were able to forgive who were best able to rebuild their lives.
Legacy
Ten Boom was honored by the State of Israel for her work in aid of the Jewish people by being invited to plant a tree in the Avenue of the Righteous Gentiles, at the Yad Vashem, near Jerusalem. Oskar Schindler is also honoured there. Rabbi Daniel Lapin has lamented how little Corrie ten Boom is known among American Jews, and how she has been ignored in the U.S. by the Holocaust Memorial Museum.
Ten Boom was knighted by the Queen of The Netherlands in recognition of her work during the war.
A museum in Haarlem, the Dutch city in which she grew up and spent much of her life, is dedicated to her and her family.
Corrie never married, and had no children.
Later years and death
In 1977, ten Boom, then 85 years old, moved to Orange, California. Successive strokes in 1978 took her powers of speech and communication and left her an invalid. She died on April 15, 1983, on her ninety-first birthday. She was said to have been happy to die on her birthday because she could "celebrate it with the Lord".


Last edited by God's Warrior on Thu Jan 28, 2010 1:01 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Read on-line or download the book, “The Secret Room – The Story of Corrie ten Boom”.

http://www.soon.org.uk/true_stories/holocaust.htm
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Corrie Ten Boom - The Joy-Filled Life

In Touch Ministries
http://www.intouch.org/myintouch/...raits/corrie_ten_boom_159770.html

Corrie Ten Boom: Corrie Ten Boom experienced the joy of Christ by making Him her hiding place.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 12:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the Jerusalem Prayer Team
http://jerusalemprayerteam.org/#

Pray for the Peace of Jerusalem

   Thou art my hiding place and my shield:  I hope in thy word.  Depart from me, ye evildoers:  for I will keep the commandments of my God.  Uphold me according unto thy word, that I may live:  and let me not be ashamed of my hope.  Hold thou me up, and I shall be safe:  ........      
                            Psalm 119:114-117a
Rescue those being led away to death;
hold back those staggering toward slaughter.
Proverbs 24:11 NIV


Keeping Alive the Corrie ten Boom Tradition of Care

The Corrie ten Boom Fellowship and its sister organization, The Corrie ten Boom Foundation of Holland, are also charged with carrying forth the vision of the ten Boom Family. Specifically, that vision is to care for and protect the Jewish people and to pray for the peace of Jerusalem, which was a 100-year weekly tradition in the ten Boom household.

The ten Boom family were devoted Christians who dedicated their lives in service to their fellow man. Their home was always an “open house” for anyone in need. During the Second World War, the ten Boom home became a refuge, a hiding place, for fugitives and those hunted by the Nazis. Like the famed Oscar Schindler, the ten Booms were instrumental in saving nearly 800 Jews from the Nazi death camps, and were imprisoned themselves for their efforts. Life in the camp was almost unbearable, but Corrie and her sister, Betsie, spent their time sharing Jesus’ love with their fellow prisoners. Many women became Christians in that terrible place because of Corrie and Betsie’s witness to them. Four members of the ten Boom family gave their lives for the family’s commitment, but Corrie came home from the death camp. She realized her life was a gift from God, and she needed to share what she and Betsy had learned in Ravensbruck. At age 53, Corrie began a worldwide ministry that took her into more than 60 countries in the next 32 years.

Keeping Alive the Corrie ten Boom Tradition of Care

The Jerusalem Prayer Team is a direct outreach of the Corrie ten Boom Fellowship. The family ten Boom started a weekly prayer meeting for the Jewish people in 1844, after a moving worship service in the Dutch Reformed Church of Rev. Witteveen. Willem ten Boom felt the need to pray for the Jewish people, so he started the weekly prayer meeting where the family and others who stopped by specifically prayed for the peace of Jerusalem (Psalm 122:6). These meetings took place every week for one hundred years, until February 28, 1944, when Nazi soldiers came to the house to take them away for helping local Jews and hiding them in a secret room. On that day, the family was together for a Bible study and prayer meeting. Following the tradition of the ten Boom family, Jerusalem Prayer Team continues to pray for the peace of Jerusalem and encourages Christians to exercise their faith by helping the Jewish people – God’s ancient people.

The Hiding Place

In 1837, Willem ten Boom opened a Clock Shop in this house. His family lived in the rooms above the shop. The ten Boom family were devoted Christians who dedicated their lives in service to their fellow man. Their home was always an "open house" for anyone in need. Through the decades, the ten Booms were very active in social work in Haarlem, and their faith inspired them to serve the religious community and society at large.

During the Second World War, the ten Boom home became a refuge, a hiding place, for fugitives and those hunted by the Nazis. By protecting these people, Casper and his daughters, Corrie and Betsie, risked their lives. This non-violent resistance against the Nazi-oppressors was the ten Boom's way of living out their Christian faith. This faith led them to hide Jews, students who refused to cooperate with the Nazis, and members of the Dutch "underground" resistance movement.

During 1943 and into 1944, there were usually 6-7 people illegally living in this home, 4 Jews and 2 or 3 members of the Dutch underground. Additional refugees would stay with the ten Booms for a few hours or a few days until another "safe house" could be located for them. Corrie became a ringleader within the network of the Haarlem underground. Corrie and "the Beje group" would search for courageous Dutch families who would take in refugees, and much of Corrie's time was spent caring for these people once they were in hiding.
Through these activities, the ten Boom family and their many friends saved the lives of an estimated 800 Jews, and protected many Dutch underground workers.

On February 28, 1944, this family was betrayed, and the Gestapo (the Nazi secret police) raided their home. The Gestapo set a trap and waited throughout the day, seizing everyone who came to the house. By evening, over 20 people had been taken into custody! Casper, Corrie, and Betsie were all arrested. Corrie's brother Willem, sister Nollie, and nephew Peter were at the house that day, and were also taken to prison.

Although the Gestapo systematically searched the house, they could not find what they sought most. They suspected Jews were in the house, but the Jews were safely hidden behind a false wall in Corrie's bedroom. In this "hiding place" were two Jewish men, two Jewish women, and two members of the Dutch underground. Although the house remained under guard, the Resistance was able to liberate the refugees two days later. The six people had managed to stay quiet in their small, dark hiding place for all that time, even though they had no water and very little food. The four Jews were taken to new "safe houses", and three survived the war. One of the underground workers was killed during the war years, but the other survived. Because underground materials and extra ration cards were found in their home, the ten Boom family was imprisoned. Casper (84 years old) died after only 10 days in Scheveningen Prison. When Casper was asked if he knew he could die for helping Jews, he replied, "It would be an honor to give my life for God's ancient people". Corrie and Betsie spent 10 months in three different prisons, the last being the infamous Ravensbruck concentration camp located near Berlin, Germany. Life in the camp was almost unbearable, but Corrie and Betsie spent their time sharing Jesus' love with their fellow prisoners. Many women became Christians in that terrible place because of Corrie and Betsie's witness to them. Betsie (59) died in Ravensbruck, but Corrie survived. Corrie's nephew, Christiaan (24), had been sent to Bergen Belsen for his work in the underground. He did not return. Corrie's brother, Willem (60), was also a ring leader in the Dutch underground. While in prison for this "crime", he contracted spinal tuberculosis and died shortly after the war.

Four ten Booms gave their lives for this family's commitment, but Corrie came home from the death camp. She realized her life was a gift from God, and she needed to share what she and Betsy had learned in Ravensbruck. "There is no pit so deep that God's love is not deeper still", and "God will give us the love to be able to forgive our enemies". At age 53, Corrie began a world-wide ministry which took her into more than 60 countries in the next 32 years! She testified to God's love and encouraged all she met with the message that "Jesus is Victor". Corrie received many tributes. Following the war, Corrie was honored by the Queen of Holland as a War Hero. In 1968, the Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem asked Corrie to plant a tree in the Garden of Righteousness, in honor of the many Jewish lives her family saved. Corrie's tree stands there today. In the early 1970's, Corrie's book THE HIDING PLACE became a best seller, and World Wide Pictures (Billy Graham Evangelistic Assoc.) released the major motion picture "The Hiding Place". Corrie went on to write many other inspiring books. There are five evangelical videos about Corrie.

Corrie was a woman faithful to God. She died on her 91st birthday, April 15, 1983. It is interesting that Corrie's passing occurred on her birthday. In the Jewish tradition, it is only very blessed people who are allowed the special privilege of dying on their birthday!

The Tradition Was Started by the Corrie ten Boom Family
The family ten Boom started a weekly prayer meeting for the Jewish people in 1844, after a moving worship service in the Dutch Reformed Church of Rev. Witteveen. Willem ten Boom felt the need to pray for the Jewish people, so he started the weekly prayer meeting, where the family and others who stopped by, specifically prayed for the peace of Jerusalem (Psalm 122:6). These meetings took place every week for one hundred years, until February 28,1944, when Nazi soldiers came to the house to take them away for helping local Jews and hiding them in a secret room. On that day, the family was together for a Bible study and prayer meeting. The Hiding Place

The Prayer Meeting Continues
In the tradition of the ten Boom family, The Corrie ten Boom Fellowship continues to pray for the peace of Jerusalem and encourages Christians to exercise their faith by helping the Jewish people.

Visit the Corrie ten Boom museum at www.corrietenboom.com

The Organization
The Corrie ten Boom Fellowship is a non-profit 501c(3) organization governed by a board of directors. Its purpose is to encourage Americans to pray for and encourage Jews around the world, but more specifically in Israel. Like the ten Boom family, it's main goal is to encourage others to pray for the peace of Jerusalem. It gains no direction or funding from the State of Israel.
STATEMENT OF FAITH
We believe in the Holy Scriptures as originally given by God, divinely inspired, infallible, entirely trustworthy; and the supreme authority in all matters of faith and conduct.
2 Peter 1:20, 21; 2 Timothy 3:15-17; John 17:17; Matthew 5:17,18
We believe in One God, eternally existent in three persons, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
Deuteronomy 6:4; 1 Timothy 1:17; Matthew 28:19; 2 Corinthians 13:14
We believe in our Lord Jesus Christ, God manifest in the flesh, His virgin birth, His sinless human life, His divine miracles, His *vicarious and atoning death, His bodily resurrection, His ascension, His *mediatorial work and His personal *imminent return in power and glory.
Colossians 2:9; John 1:1; Galatians 4:4; Matthew 1:23; Hebrews 4:15; Acts 2:22,23; 1 Peter 3:18; Colossians 2:13,14: 2 Corinthians 5:21; 1 John 1:7; 1 Corinthians 15:4; Mark 16: 9; Romans 8:34; Hebrews 7:25; Matthew 24:30
We believe in God the Holy Spirit, by whose indwelling the believer is enabled to live a holy life, and to witness and work for the Lord Jesus Christ.
Acts 5:3,4; Romans 8:9-11; Romans 8:12-14; Galatians 5:16-25; Acts 1:8; Matthew 10:19,20; John 14:26; 15:26,27
We believe in the Salvation of lost and sinful people through the shed blood of the Lord Jesus Christ by grace alone through faith, apart from works and by regeneration of the Holy Spirit.
1 Peter 3:18; Ephesians 2:8,9; 1 John 1:8 - 2:2; Romans 3:21-26; Titus 3:4-7
We believe in the unity of Spirit of all true believers, which comprises the Church, the Body of Christ.
John 17: 20-23; Ephesians 2:12-22
We believe in the mission of the Church, as described in Acts 1:8, is to go to all the world and make disciples of all nations.
Matthew 28:18-20; Luke 24: 45-47; Acts 2:8
We believe in the Resurrection of both the saved and the lost: they that are saved unto the resurrection of life, they that are lost unto the resurrection of damnation.
1 Corinthians 15: 20-26; 42-44; John 5:21-29; 1 John 5:10-12; Revelation 20:11-15
*vicarious: substituting for, or feeling in place of, another
*mediatorial: the role of reconciling or bringing an agreement between others
*imminent: likely to occur soon; impending (From the New American Webster College Dictionary)

The Corrie ten Boom Museum
http://www.corrietenboom.com/

http://www.corrietenboom.com/exhbits.htm
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 12:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Read more and seem more pictures here:

http://temple-baptist.com/history/corrie_ex.htm
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2011 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A 1974 Interview of Corrie ten Boom
Pat Robertson's Interview with Corrie ten Boom...

Corrie ten Boom talked about the horror she experienced under the Nazi and the courage and faith she has in God

http://apps.facebook.com/youtubebox/video.asp?uvid=12002624&ref=nf
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